Plotting film toponyms: A study in cultural geo-analytics

My colleagues Stefano De Sabbata, Daniel Chavez Heras, and I have a new short paper out, accepted for Spatial Humanities 2022. After many years of rumination, we have finally started doing some geospatial analytics on film data, which I find very exciting. 🎬🗺📈 Abstract: Films are deeply geographical. Externally, they are produced in places, across … Continue reading Plotting film toponyms: A study in cultural geo-analytics

Localizing content moderation in Facebook groups

Pleased to share this short paper written with Scott Rodgers et al. The paper is discussed in an excellent presentation by Liam McLoughlin: https://youtu.be/do_JWl1DZvs Abstract. This paper contributes to the burgeoning literature on content moderation by focusing on its practice in relation to localized social media contexts, an area which remains under-researched. It makes two … Continue reading Localizing content moderation in Facebook groups

The spatial and temporal variability of Wikipedia content in London

Our student Shahreen Nawfee will present her new short paper at the flagship conference GIScience 2021, which is happening online this year. Check out the conference programme here. Abstract. Spatial user-generated content (UGC) is increasingly being used to study a variety of geographical phenomena, including urban change in social and economic dimensions. Wikipedia content evolves over … Continue reading The spatial and temporal variability of Wikipedia content in London

This city is not a bin: User-generated content to map litter

I am pleased to share this new article that just appeared in the Journal of Industrial Ecology. It is a inter-disciplinary study between industrial ecology and geographic data science that I crafted with my esteemed colleagues in Leiden Stefano Cucurachi et al. It is nice to see that the study received some media coverage. The … Continue reading This city is not a bin: User-generated content to map litter

Defining Natural Points of Interest

In this new short paper by our student Charlie Hewitt at GISRUK 2021, which will run online again later in April. Abstract. This paper contributes to the working definition of natural points of interest (NPOI). We combine a theory-driven approach exploring existing definitions of points of interest and natural features and a data-driven approach in … Continue reading Defining Natural Points of Interest

Urban Consumption Patterns: OpenStreetMap and the Social Sciences

Here is a new conference paper with my colleagues Hamidreza Rabiei Dastjerdi and Gavin McArdle on the use of crowdsourced geospatial data for social science research at GISTAM 2020. Abstract. Citizen consumption refers to the goods and services which citizens utilise. This includes time spent on leisure and cultural activities as well as the consumption … Continue reading Urban Consumption Patterns: OpenStreetMap and the Social Sciences

Los Angeles as a digital place: mapping bias in user-generated content

In this new article, written with fellow geographer Stefano De Sabbata, we explore the relationship between spatial user-generated content from Twitter, Foursquare, OpenStreetMap, and Wikipedia and socio-economic variables in Los Angeles County [read the full paper in PDF]. All the data and resources are freely available on GitHub. Abstract: Online representations of places are becoming pivotal in informing our … Continue reading Los Angeles as a digital place: mapping bias in user-generated content

Assessing the Usability of Participatory GIS

In this new article, my colleagues of the SeaSketch team, Werner Kuhn, and I developed a questionnaire to evaluate the usability of participatory GIS [read the full paper in PDF]. The article was nominated as Best Full Paper at AGILE 2019. All the data and resources are freely available on GitHub.   Abstract: Since its emergence in the 1990s, … Continue reading Assessing the Usability of Participatory GIS

Tracing Search Geographies with Google Trends: 6 lessons learnt

In a new article that will be presented at AGILE later this year, my colleagues Simon Scheider, Bas Spierings, and I explore the potential of Google Trends to understand how the search interest in geographic areas changes in space and time, looking at the Amsterdam metropolitan region as a case study [read the full paper … Continue reading Tracing Search Geographies with Google Trends: 6 lessons learnt